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 UIUC \ MechSE \ Johnson Research Group \ Home

>> Welcome

We study the mechanics of electronic and optical materials. Our work has applications ranging from microelectronic materials processing, to photovoltaics, to nanoscale sensors and actuators.

>> Contact Us

Prospective graduate students may contact Prof. Johnson for more information. Due to the number of inquiries received, it may not be possible for us to answer every request. Students may also apply for admission to the graduate programs in the Department of Mechanical Science & Engineering or direct questions to the MechSE Graduate Admissions Coordinator, Ms. Katrina Hagler.


To find out more about our research, please see a list of our recent journal articles.

>> News & Updates

2014:

 

         The ME PhD program is rated #5 in the latest USNWR rankings!

         Congratulations to graduate student Kyle Mackay, who has received an Honorable Mention in the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship competition.

         The new DOE X-PACC Center is official!

 

2013:

 

         Welcome to new graduate students and group members Kyle Mackay (BSME, Utah State, 13) and Logan Rowe (BSME, Kettering University, 13)

         Congratulations to graduate student Kallol Das, who has been named a Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) Fellow!

 

2012:

 

         Welcome to new graduate student and group member Purnima Ghale (BSME, Stanford, 12)

         Congratulations to postdoc Andrey Semichaevsky, who has started a faculty position in the Department of Physics at Lincoln University.

         Prof. Johnson has been elected a Fellow of ASME.

         Congratulations to graduate student Brian McGuigan, who has received an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship!

 

  

 

 

>> Past Research Highlights

 

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We develop new atomistic modeling methods such as tight-binding, to study nanotubes, quantum dots, and defects and interfaces in electronic materials.

 

We study the mechanics of quantum dots, or nanoscale material clusters, including the effects of stress on formation and properties of these structures.

 

We use finite element based computational electromagnetics to study the effects of defects and disorder in photonic bandgap devices.

 

Using molecular dynamics and continuum modeling, we study the development of stress in MEMS devices and microelectronic materials due to ion-bombardment processing.

 

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We study dislocations in electronic materials to understand how strain and electronic structure affect device properties.

 

We use continuum and atomistic models to study the electrical properties of deformed carbon nanotubes.

 

We study nanoscale surface instabilities using multiscale atomistic & continuum methods.

 

Combining finite element analysis and nonlinear topology optimization methods, we design optimized nanophotonic devices.

 

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